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A reece videos 2019

After a silence that has been too long for his fans, A-Reece has resurfaced with a new music video for "We Both Know Better. The music video was directed by Cape Town-based director Motion Billy. It was filmed in the Mother City and consists mostly of night scenes in the city's streets. Apart from the models featured in the video, A-Reece's longtime producer MashBeatz makes an appearance. The single sees Reece talk to a woman he just broke up with, expressing his desire to get back together with her even though they've both since moved on. He raps:. He even skipped October 21, a date that Reece fans have grown to expect the lyricist to bless them with a release as he has in the since the release of his debut album Paradise in on the same date. A-reece - We Both Know Better www. The cast of this groundbreaking British series tell us about making an unapologetically Black show. Michaela Coel knows how to tell her story her way.
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VDJ Flex Prod. Chris Martin Video 3 days ago Harrysong ft. Delivered By FeedBurner. Trending Tags. Store Sign up. Home Artistes A-Reece. A-Reece's Top Songs. View More. A-Reece's Recent Songs. Social Channels.

The album is dedicated to his fans, [1] released by The Wrecking Crew on 21 October The album mostly contains features of conscious rap music. The single released from the album was "Feelings", featuring Flame and is the 15th track of the album. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. Learn how and when to remove these template messages. The topic of this article may not meet Wikipedia's notability guideline for music. Please help to establish notability by citing reliable secondary sources that are independent of the topic and provide significant coverage of it beyond a mere trivial mention. If notability cannot be established, the article is likely to be merged , redirected , or deleted.

After a silence that has been too long for his fans, A-Reece has resurfaced with a new music video for "We Both Know Better. The music video was directed by Cape Town-based director Motion Billy. It was filmed in the Mother City and consists mostly of night scenes in the city's streets. Apart from the models featured in the video, A-Reece's longtime producer MashBeatz makes an appearance.

The single sees Reece talk to a woman he just broke up with, expressing his desire to get back together with her even though they've both since moved on. He raps:. He even skipped October 21, a date that Reece fans have grown to expect the lyricist to bless them with a release as he has in the since the release of his debut album Paradise in on the same date.

A-reece - We Both Know Better www. The cast of this groundbreaking British series tell us about making an unapologetically Black show. Michaela Coel knows how to tell her story her way.

With I May Destroy You , her latest series, she doubles down on that creative impulse, validating not only her story, but those of others to come. Bravely using her real-life experience of sexual assault at a London club as a springboard, Coel, already beloved for Chewing Gum , created a game-changing series challenging our society to adapt to the 21st century realities of sexual assault amid a hookup and drug culture. And she is being widely recognized and celebrated for it on both sides of the pond. Photo by Natalie Seery.

Not in the U. There are no intermediaries. When we first meet Arabella, she is tagging along with a friend and partying. The next day she gets these disturbing images in her head and, over time, realizes she was raped. As she is processing what happened and, more importantly, dealing with it, legally and personally, she leans on her longtime friends Terry and Kwame.

Because, unfortunately, life doesn't just standstill because something traumatic happened to you. There are, of course, instances where a racial context is unavoidable, but it never drives the narrative. In addition to Arabella's story, the series explores Kwame's experiences as a gay man, as well as friendship and loyalty, particularly as it relates to Terry and Arabella who have been close chums since they were schoolgirls.

It's a three-dimensional portrait of life centered around the aftermath of Arabella's sexual assault delivered with both drama and humor. It certainly affects her sex and dating life. Going forward she becomes way more sensitive to issues of sex and consent. Finding her rapist even takes on a life of its own, with the investigation revealing ugly truths about some of the men in her life.

In addition, she is moved to share her story, in ways not so convenient for her career or, at times, her friendships, as well as use her voice, particularly through social media, to champion other survivors in a way that is intended to give them a voice of their own.

All of this intersects with her personal friendships with Terry and Kwame. So it's within the context of Arabella's story that we gain insight into theirs. One of the series' triumphs is its ability to highlight the Black immigrant experience in England, as well as the Black experience overall in the way that it matters most—as regular, everyday life. What we see in Arabella's story is a universal experience that is usually reflected through a white lens only, when, in reality, no woman is immune to the scourge of sexual violence. And then when I go to Ghana, people can tell by the way I walk alone that I am not living in Ghana or born in Ghana; they can tell.

So, it's an interesting hybrid. But I also think there are so many people within the UK that are in that same twoness that it creates a oneness because we are each a tribe of diaspora and, within that, we've made our own oneness. So, it's quite interesting. While auditioning for a beauty gig, the two white women producers whimsically ask Terry to reveal her natural hair.

In that moment, Terry's fear is so palpable, forcing us to see how unseen her experiences as a Black woman, a woman of color, are. Some people attach a lot of importance to it. But I think that moment [reveals] the micro-aggressions rooted in ignorance of not knowing Black women's hair to ask a question like that. Arabella changes her hair far more often but, whether it's pink, bald, head-wrapped or just straight, it's never a big deal among her friends. And, for TV, that is a big deal.

I mean I know I get bored every couple of weeks and, to see it reflected on TV, I think a lot of Black women [are] able to relate to that and appreciate the versatility of Black women's hair. So it's interesting to see. And the reactions have been quite interesting to see a lot of Black women happy that these things are being shown because it's a reflection of some people's realities," Opia shares.

As a Black gay man, Kwame makes a statement, particularly as he explores sexual boundaries in his own life that bear a similarity to Arabella's in that they cross the line between consent and assault. It's a reminder that Black gay men also have interior lives. Essiedu, who is also of Ghanaian descent and is a longtime friend of Coel's, found that depth appealing. Something big happens to him and he responds to his trauma in a lot of ways, some of which is kind of predictable and some really unpredictable, and there's something really human in that and it's not often that you get characters that double down on humanity," he explains.

Afterwards, it's a different scenario and she does not take her success or impact for granted. Instead, she uses it to empower others to soar even higher. Keep reading Show less.



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